Tag: shooting

Action Target Rimfire Challenge Sponsorship

April 20, 2017   |   Action Target Rimfire Challenge Sponsorship

Parma, ID – – Action Target, the leader in modern shooting range development, equipment and services is proud to be a Gold Sponsor of the Northwest Championship Rimfire Challenge. The fifth-annual July 28- 29th event will bring both professional and novice shooters together for two days of challenging, yet fun shooting matches.

Sold out in a record setting four days, the event was open to all ages and all skills levels and is designed to be a fun and safe shooting match for the entire family. Incorporating both .22 caliber pistols and rifles, courses of fire are created with safety as the top priority but feature fun scenarios that meet shooters skill level. Considered to be one of the premier rimfire Championships in the nation, shooters from all skill levels will be participating, from professional shooters to first-time attendees.

The match has 12 Stages and 126 shooters arriving from 18 States and Canada. Thanks to the overwhelming success and generous sponsors, the prize table has grown incredibly fast and is presented in a luck of the draw format. This is a family friendly match that encourages shooters of all ages and skill levels come out and have a great time. Action Target expressed their enthusiasm to be sponsoring the NWRC. Seth Ercanbrack, Marketing Manager for Action Target tells us, “The NWRC is a match that we look forward to every year. The fun and friendly staff runs a well-organized match with an atmosphere that is hard to beat. Action Target is proud to be a sponsor for this premier NSSF Rimfire Challenge match.”

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For more information on the 5th Annual NSSF Northwest Championship Rimfire Challenge:

NRA’s American Rifleman Tests the AWD Pro

Training With the Action Target AWD Range System

Training With the Action Target AWD Range System

Although we spend a good deal of time discussing firearms and ammunition on this site, they wouldn’t be all that interesting to own without quality shooting ranges where we can exercise our rights. One company that’s often overlooked by the average shooter for its important contribution to the industry is Action Target of Provo, Utah.


Founded in 1986, Action Target started out by providing a pneumatic turning-target system for the Provo Police Department to use for training its officers. Over the years, this company has developed top-grade range technology favored by military and law enforcement around the world.


If you attend SHOT Show, you’ll find that Action Target takes up a section of floor space more like a city block than a booth slot. Today’s in-house options from Action Target include a variety of equipment such as portable interactive steel targets, eco-friendly bullet traps and entire training structures like the ALERRT shoot house. A tour of its production facility revealed just how much steel the company processes into range equipment.


As much as we can appreciate the services and facilities that help keep our country’s service personnel sharp, most of us will never get to use them. I wanted to learn more about how Action Target is tackling the training needs of John Q. Public. To answer this question, I was invited to company headquarters where I was introduced to the AWD Range System, one of the more advanced options currently installed at commercial indoor ranges.

The AWD, or All Wheel Drive target support (called a target retriever), was just one part of the complete set of furniture at the test range I visited. The shooting stalls, ceiling-mounted rails, noise abatement, bullet trap and ventilation were all selected from Action Target Offerings. These elements all came together to form a professional grade, clean-lined shooting environment that was comfortable and convenient to use.

Traditional square ranges, which wheel paper targets back and forth, are useful for developing important marksmanship skills such as forming a sight picture, trigger press and reloading. Paper targets also have the advantage of being fairly inexpensive. However, back-and-forth targets don’t offer much more than that. Even the most devoted shooting enthusiast can, at times, find traditional square ranges to be a little tedious.

The AWD system employs the rail-mounted target retriever paired with a programmable, wireless touch-screen control pad. The retriever is fast, smooth and quiet, traveling at up to four yards per second. It’s also accurate, consistently stopping along the rail within 0.5″ of its programmed position. The retriever’s paper-target clamp is motorized to rotate 360 degrees. This allows it to display the front, back and side edge of the target toward the shooter and present a variety of shoot/don’t shoot configurations as the target changes locations.

What makes the AWD system such an interesting and useful update to square-range shooting is software programmed into the wireless touch control. To keep folks engaged, it’s preloaded with more than two dozen different games and drills developed by professional instructors. Beginner, intermediate and advanced formats are available for pistols and rifles. The Pistol Qualification Drills can be used by civilians or law enforcement to practice using standardized qualification scenarios. The personal-defense programs provide self-guided training with charging, reload and decision-making drills, while the game programs keep things interesting.

One of the system’s programmed behaviors that was refreshing and challenging to work with is called a “tease” function. There are times that when the target is turned edgewise, it will twitch as if it’s about to turn, but then it doesn’t. In other words, it tries to fake you out once in a while! If you’re too quick on the trigger you’ll send a round hurdling downrange into empty space.

The AWD’s programmable controls and the option to use a wide variety of different paper targets make the system one of the most flexible indoor shooting experiences available. Using a duty-size Smith & Wesson M&P 9 mm pistol provided by the staff, I started off with a basic shoot/don’t shoot drill with the target stopping, turning to face me and then moving further away for the next series of shots. Simple exercises are a great place to start for the beginner or to get warmed up.

Then we switched over to an intermediate skills drill using a target with much smaller round strike zones. The target’s face times were much shorter, varied in length, and the target would tease me from time to time. This was much more challenging. For those ranges that choose to add it, the system includes advanced lighting features. Choose from a constant on “daylight” white light, or low-light situations that include simulated muzzle flashes or police-car strobe lights.

The shooting session wrapped up with self-defense scenarios, which can provide a real eye-opening experience. Unlike most ranges, where the targets usually rest a good ways out, the AWD can be programmed to drive a paper target straight toward the shooter at high speed to simulate the charge of an assailant. In my case, we used an image of an attacker wielding a knife. I caught myself “rubber necking” with this target a couple of times.

When drivers become focused on an accident at the side of the road, their hands will turn the steering wheel toward that spot, causing the car to drift out of its lane. As the target charged me from several yards away, I had a few shots drift from center to the left side of the target as it rushed up to me. That’s where the knife was, over on the left side. As the threat drew closer, I let my attention drift from center mass to the knife. As a result, the shot placement followed. Details like these can only be learned through personal experience.


The Action Target AWD system has been installed at commercial shooting ranges all around the country. Just follow this link and use the map at the bottom of the page to locate a facility near you. And as long as you’re on the site, take a few minutes to look over the top-notch selection of portable steel targets the company offers as well.


Action Target Elevates Shooting with New Retriever 

PROVO, Utah – Action Target Inc., the leading manufacturer of shooting ranges, today announced its release of the All Wheel Drive (AWD) Pro: a new target retriever proven to take ranges to the next level.

The wireless AWD Pro retriever is the most engaging and robust retriever on the market. It features a modern, easy to use interface with 27 addicting games and training scenarios for all skill levels. These programs offer shooters an unparalleled experience, improving both novice and expert shooters and keeping them at the range longer.

“Shooting at a static target is no longer sufficient to engage this new generation of shooters. They expect more from their equipment and are looking for an entertaining experience. The AWD Pro engages shooters like never before, with its intuitive interface, self-guided shooting scenarios and easy-to-setup drills. Not only will shooters benefit from this new equipment, but the range will as well,” said Jesse Nelson an Action Target Product Marketing Manager.

The AWD Pro was recently installed at Nashville Armory in Nashville, Tennessee, where shooters were ecstatic with the update. After the installation, ammunition consumption increased over 23% and 89% of shooters said they enjoyed the new retriever over traditional range equipment. Another interesting statistic was that over 80% of shooters interviewed said they would drive farther and pay more to use the new equipment over traditional range equipment.

These numbers can be attributed to the addicting shooting scenarios the AWD Pro offers. These preloaded games and drills were developed by leading firearms trainers and challenge every shooter no matter their skill level.  Whether shooters are trying to improve their previous score on a drill or are competing with their friends with one of the games, shooters will find themselves using more ammunition and feeling more satisfied when they leave the range. Plus, the fun environment of competing with friends on challenging drills adds an element that shooting ranges have lacked in the past and will keep shooters coming back for more.

The AWD Pro’s friendly touch screen user interface also plays a part in the new shooter experience. With its intuitive and engaging design, users are able to control more including: shooting distance, stall lighting, target lighting, target behavior, time drills and more. All of these features give the shooters more freedom, putting them in charge of their experience at the range.

“This product is just one of many future developments that testifies of Action Target’s long-term commitment to developing the shooter’s experience as well as breathing new technology and innovation into the shooting range industry. We are convinced the AWD Pro will meet the needs of today’s shooters by promoting skill building, competition and an overall higher engagement with the shooting sports,” said Kevin Tomaszewski, Action Target’s Vice President of Marketing and Engineering.

The AWD Pro gives shooters a whole new experience of improving their shooting skills while having a good time, making it the reason ranges with the AWD Pro will become the go to destination. To learn more about the AWD Pro visit link: www.actiontarget.com/products/awd_pro.

Keys to a Successful Shot

By George Harris

Much has been written about precision shooting in the world of combat skill development and pistol shooting in general. Perspectives and definitions of how and why we hit the intended target vary so greatly that two people involved in a heated discussion regarding precision shooting may be very parallel in their thinking, but they don’t recognize it. In this article, I will talk about how and why our views concerning this subject work. Ultimately, the goal is to bring us all a little closer in defining this controversial subject and understanding what we need to see in order to deliver a successful shot.

All of my training methods stem from simplicity in firearms training. I like to cut through all of the fluff, and present concepts that make sense and are easily reproducible by the average shooter. Most of us subscribe to the age old premise that most likely originated with the invention of firearms in that the objective of shooting is hitting your target.LETC 018

Let’s start by discussing the two absolutes of hitting a target. They are muzzle management and trigger finger discipline. Since the bullet exits the muzzle on the way to the target, it seems likely that from zero to fifty yards (plus or minus), if the muzzle is pointed at the target when the bullet exits, then we will have ourselves a hit where we want it. Trigger finger discipline refers to how we release the bullet toward the target. If you stabilize the muzzle of the pistol on the target and operate the trigger without disturbing that stability, you will experience success. Make sense? My students think so!

Precision shooting is a total mystery to some simply because they are confused about what they must see to consistently hit the target. Sight alignment and sight picture are two regularly used terms in the precision shooting world, but they aren’t always fully understood. Sight alignment is nothing more than the front and rear sight as viewed by the eye. Perfect sight alignment is the front sight vertically and horizontally centered in the rear sight notch. Sight picture is the target, front sight and rear sight as viewed by the eye. Perfect sight picture is the front sight centered vertically and horizontally in the rear sight notch superimposed on the desired point of impact of the target.

In studying human vision, we find that the eye can clearly focus on a single plane, plus or minus an inch or two. Everything else ranges from a little to a lot out of focus. Relate this to a camera lens. The camera has clarity at its primary point of interest and everything closer or further away is less than perfectly clear. A little known fact is that the eye can pick the center of any object, regardless of its shape. It can do this without having total visual clarity of the object and can be accurate down to one minute of angle (a half inch circle at fifty yards).

Shooting Shoot045Now, let’s take a closer look at how and why precision shooting works. The muzzle of the pistol must be square with the target to hit the target. Think perpendicular with a very slight upward angle to account for the effects of gravity on the bullet, and horizontally centered. We use our sights as a guide to position the muzzle on the target. The more precisely we align our sights, the closer the muzzle is to square with the face of the target, and the more likely we will hit our desired point of impact, assuming that the pistol is already zeroed. The clear focus on the front sight as viewed through the slightly out of focus rear sight allows us the best chance to position the muzzle square to the target. The target should be out of focus, but its shape should be apparent. As stated above, the eye will automatically find the center of any object.

What this boils down to is that precision sight alignment will square the muzzle (where the bullet exits the gun) on the center of the target, which our eye automatically finds, for a hit in the desired location.

Bull’s-eye shooters that shoot the blank side of their target and shoot better groups than when they are shooting the target side prove the concept that the eye will naturally find the center of an object consistently. By keeping the eye focus on the sights through the release of the shot, the muzzle remains square with the target, and a consistent impact point is hit again and again.

A simple and extremely effective sight picture that we developed for the aged-eye shooters (those in bi-focals and tri-focals) has become the standard sight picture for all of our students who aren’t happy with their present method of hitting the target where they want to. We recommend a dot on the front sight and the widest notch available for the type of rear sight to be used. This allows us to use the eye’s natural ability to center round objects in square openings with incredible precision. We zero the pistol for the strike of the round to hit whatever we put the front sight dot on, just as we would a red dot sight system. The regimen is to center the dot in the rear sight notch and float the dot on the target. With a smooth trigger press to release the shot, the thrill of a center hit is felt again and again.

EDITOR’S NOTE: The views and opinions expressed in this article are those of the author and do not necessarily reflect the official position of Action Target as a company.

About George Harris

George Harris has spent his entire adult life working in the world of firearms. For over 30 years he has been a successful and motivational educator and trainer in all aspects of small arms. His simplistic approach to firearms training has an unarguable track record in extracting performance from his students of marksmanship, tactics, and maintenance.

As a business developer in the firearms field, George co-founded the world renowned SIG Sauer Academy and led it to become a profit center before retiring after twenty-one years of service.

George has the enviable record of leading industry test programs for multiple government and military agencies achieving successful results and contracts for firearms 100% of the time.

Many of his innovations and ideas in firearms design features have evolved to production firearms improving function, ergonomics, and aesthetics.

George has served as the subject matter expert involving firearms and related matters on television, radio, and in legal proceedings.

Among his personal accomplishments, George earned the coveted U.S. Army Distinguished badges for both Service Pistol and Service Rifle. He also coached and was a firing team member of the World Champion U.S. Army Reserve International Combat Team before retiring with 40 years of continuous Military Service.